Nevs board repair - PART 2

The deck on one of Nevs wave boards had become soft and spongy between front and rear footstraps, so we decided to fix it. In PART 1 of this article we had removed the damaged area, injected foaming resin into the gaps, and applied a layer of glass and high density foam to replace the damaged sandwich layer. This was all done following the steps laid out on the Board Lady's website, which is a great resource for all manner of board repairs.

Foaming resin fill sanded and feathered

High density foam gaps filled, sanded and feathered

So the next step was to prep the area for vacuum bagging. I applied a bit of Mentholated spirits (similar to rubbing alcohol) to remove any residue from the surrounding area. Then I applied a layer of gaffer tape, then double sided tacky tape - with the ends of the backing lifted ready to be pealed off. (NOTE: Eva 'The Board Lady' suggests in the comments below that it would have been better to use Bluetac to seal such a rough and uneven surface). Next I laid the glass matting over the area and marked out the outline. I cut out two of these shapes in the glass matting with scissors. Next I prepared a piece of peel ply, breather (I use heavy duty paper towel), and the layer of plastic. Finally I stacked everything in reverse order in the right orientation, ready to be applied.

Mix epoxy and apply

Mix epoxy and apply

Next I mixed a patch of slow hardening epoxy. I use dedicated syringes to measure it out in the right proportions, and mix it with a spoon for at least a minute. This is applied to the foam quite lavishly to make sure if fills the voids and bubbles on the surface.

Apply each glass fibre layer, wetting with a brush

Apply each glass fibre layer, wetting with a brush

Now orientate and apply each glass fibre layer, wetting them down with a small chip brush - cut short to provide a stippling action. The glass should soak up the epoxy resin and become transparent. A bit of extra resin may need to be applied, but be sparing.

Apply the vacuum

Apply the vacuum

Once all layers of glass are applied, I lay down the peel ply, breather, remove the backing from the tacky tape and overlay the clear plastic film. I start at one end and pull it reasonably tight so there are no gaps or creases in the plastic film on the tacky tape. There are two holes in this sheet, one in the centre and one on the edge. I place a piece of gaffer tape over the hole I am not using. Starting at the centre I apply the vacuum to suck air out of the area. This proceeds until the peel ply is completely wet with resin and all the air bubbles have worked their way out - it takes about 5-10 minutes depending on how well sealed the area is. At this point the vacuum starts to hold, and the vacuum switch starts shutting the motor off intermittently. Now I tape up the centre hole and start applying vacuum to the edge. this sucks all the edges down tight and keeps everything in place. The vacuum remains in place until the resin has hardened to the consistency of toffee, at which point I switch the vacuum pump off and leave the epoxy to cure over night.

After feathering the edges, epoxy filler is applied

After feathering the edges, epoxy filler is applied

Once cured, I feathered the edges with my random orbital sander with a fresh 160 grit disk. To even out the remaining bumps and voids I applied some epoxy filler. Once cured it can be sanded back. The final step is to apply come contact cement to the deck and eva foam under-surface, wait until its tack dry and press it back down onto the deck. Should be good as new.

Nev arrives to collect his board

Nev arrives to collect his board

Nev turned up with a case of Corona's to thank me for my efforts - Gav also dropped in for a sticky beak and we all shared a cold beer.

Finished board

| Me with the finished board straight after its first session

Nev took the board out for a cranking session and felt is was as good as it had ever been. He also noted that he didn't realise just how much that space between the foot straps got pounded in transitions. I think it pretty bulletproof now ;)

Conclusion

This was a pretty ambitious board repair and a valuable learning experience for me to get familiar with the use of these processes and materials. The lessons I took away from this repair was the importance of accurately measuring the parts of epoxy and foaming resins that go together, making sure to stir them thoroughly, and being patient - giving every stage plenty of time to fully cure. You just need to be systematic and methodical.

Posted by Henry Thomas, 6 years ago on Sunday, September 25, 2011

5 comments:

Eva Hollmann said...

Cool! what I don’t get, though, is your using Duct Tape under the vacuum film. I would not think you could get that to seal tight...

Posted 6 years ago on Sunday, September 25, 2011

Henry Thomas said...

Hi Eva,

Nev didn't want to peel back all the EVA deck, so I didn't have a large flat area around the repair to stick the double sided tape to, so I figured I would try to seal it with the duct tape. As you point out, it never seals really well, but it sealed enough to hold the vacuum. I am still learning.

Posted 6 years ago on Monday, September 26, 2011

Eva Hollmann said...

Get yourself some mastic! Its kind of like sillyputty or Playdough, except that it sticks better. It will conform to all manner of uneven surfaces and seal really well. If you can’t get it from a hardware store (its sold there for the purpose of sealing between metal panels), try the stationary store, where it is sold as “Readytac” or somesuch, to stick posters to walls.

Posted 6 years ago on Monday, September 26, 2011

wardy said...

I've got heaps of vacuum bagging sealant if ya ever need any.

Posted 6 years ago on Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Henry Thomas said...

Thanks Andrew, I may take you up on that offer if I get more requests for repairs.

Posted 6 years ago on Wednesday, October 5, 2011

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